Design by Yana

Landscape Design Portfolio
Landscape Design

Cottonwood Residential Layout

This is a private residential project on Cottonwood Street in Bozeman, Montana. The design takes into account client’s budget, aesthetic taste, and functional desires in which the designer works within the client’s needs and desires while still providing a sustainable vision.

Cottonwood Residential Layout

This project seeks to create a design utilizing the upmost sustainable approach in which investigating program, inventory, and analysis is considered. Special attention is given to the site’s sense of place for philosophical conceptualization.

Sustainable Technology Layout

This study explores materials and processes for holistic sustainability; one approach to altruism in design.  Details and specification information development enable the designer to become an expert on the chosen material technology.  The project requires researching and developing details for a sustainable building material or concept. Once a material or concept of interest is identified, two details drawings are produced and/or compositions with a section/perspective in order to illustrate construction.  This project is an illustrated detail and not a construction detail; relaying how this technology differs from “conventional” and “traditional” approaches.

Hannon Hall Layout

This is final conceptual plan is for the landscape in Hannon Hall Courtyard on the campus of Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana. The designer considers how the planting design impacts staff, faculty, students and lifecycle costs.

Habitat for Humanity Layout

This project provides an example of creative and challenging work. This design took into account budgets and  the tastes of clients.  The designer working within the client needs and desires while still providing a unique vision. This seeks to create a rich planting design for a private residence in the Bozeman, Montana. Specifically a townhome for Habitat for Humanity.  The plan considers how design impacts the residential users and takes into account the different programmatic uses planting design creates. The planting design elevates beyond a “typical” residential design. The design finds inspiration from the “jump start” narrative to push boundaries in what spaces create and how to create variety through planting design. This project explores how the design element texture can be used to enhance a design. The element textures is a theme to achieve the design principals of variety, proportion and scale.

Cottonwood Plan

Space design is elevated beyond a typical residential design and inspiration for the design is found by selecting and investigating place making; sense of place theory.  This project explores how the design element line and form can be manipulated to create a design.  The elements are utilized as a theme to achieve the design principals of scale and proportion.  Design boundaries are pushed and economy and unity are strived for.  Exercises on site inventory, analysis, programming in addition to ideas of place making; a fully rendered conceptual plan presentation was created.

Cottonwood Perspective

“Somewhere in every garden, there must be at least one spot, a quiet garden seat, in which a person – or two people – can reach into themselves and be in touch with nothing else but nature.” –  A Pattern Language

The inspiration for this design came from A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander.  As stated in Alexander’s book, “Set aside one piece of land either in the private garden or on common land as a vegetable garden…Make sure that the vegetable garden is in a sunny place and central to all the households it serves” (herb garden – north-west perspective).  He also writes, “Make a quiet place in the garden – a private enclosure with a comfortable seat, thick planting, sun.  Pick the place for the seat carefully; pick the place that will give you the most intense kind of solitude” (bench facing native grasses and wildflowers – north-east perspective).

Cottonwood Section

Perhaps one of the most striking and motivational statements in Alexander’s book reads, “When trees are planted or pruned without regard for the special places they can create, they are as good as dead for the people who need them.”  The elements within the southern perspective is directly inspired by, “When people eat together, they may actually be together in spirit – or they may be far apart.  Some rooms invite people to eat leisurely and comfortably and feel together.”   The goal of this design is to, “Make all the outdoor spaces which surround and lie between your buildings positive… Build a place outdoors which has so much enclosure round it, that it takes on the feeling of a room, even though it is open to the sky” in accordance to the objective of landscapes within a site.

Cottonwood SketchUp Plan

An additional concept plan was constructed in Google SketchUp for the Cottonwood residential project.

Hannon Hall Plan

The project introduces finding inspiration from Michael Van Valkenburgh.  Researching the landscape architect’s style, thoughts and design philosophy.  This inspiration influences the planting design in the project.  The design explores how to manipulate line to create form and composition. Using the element of line as a theme to achieve the design principals of balance and emphasis.

Hannon Hall Perspective

The lines carry users through the site and give a sense of peacefulness, as well as an awareness of activity.  The balance is primarily achieved by nonequivalent masses and carefully positioned elements throughout the site.  The smaller elements at entrance of the site carry less visual weight than the background.  Yet, the foreground promotes curiosity and movement to the large trees, vertical stone and water features in the background.  The irregular design of the porous concrete pavers in the background, also initiate contrast and provide emphasis.

Hannon Hall Base Map

This design is inspired by line, emphasis, balance and the work of landscape architect, Michael Van Valkenburgh.  The informal design provides a feeling of balance by means of asymmetrical and perspective equilibrium.  The plan reflects a natural environment to activate and beautify the space.  Directly inspired by Valkenburgh, the site boasts creativity by exploring the combination of naturalism and artificiality.  The hedge and vertical rock wall designs were also inspired by Valkenburgh.  The rectilinear design furnishes a consistency among the planting and hardscape forms for a dynamic and harmonious personality.

Habitat for Humanity Plan

The inspiration for this design came from a narrative, as well as the work of Roberto Burle Marx and Luis Barragan.  This design promotes variety, proportion and scale of texture.  The influential narrative reads as follows, “there once was a bee that wore stripped pajamas, lived in a lighthouse and decided to take a trip to South America in a hot air balloon.”  The initial interpretation of the narrative conclusively called for primary colors within a rectilinear design.  However, after exploring the work of South American landscape architect, Roberto Marx and Mexican architect Luis Barragan, the form evolved to a curvilinear design integrated with strong, vibrantly colored walls.  Marx’s design of the roof-terrace floor for the headquarters of the Safra Bank in Sao Paulo is the configuration from which the plan for habitat for humanity derives its form.

Habitat for Humanity Elevation

The colors of the plan, elevation, fence and graphics of the design stem from the work of Marx and Barragan as well.  The color and design of the fence mural is a preliminary scale drawing of the interior mural Marx completed for the Souza Aguiar Hospital in Rio de Janeiro.  The colors of the plan were extracted from one of Marx’s most famous gardens of the Odette Monteiro Residence also located in Rio de Janeiro.  The clumped and monochrome vegetative masses also come from the Rio Residence.  The black and white Portuguese stone mosaic modeled in parabolic waves comes from Marx’s Copacabana Promenade design in Rio de Janeiro.  The bulk of the plant material consists of vertical and vase-shaped forms consisting of coarse textures of warm red, yellow, orange and white colors with some variegation; chosen for their high visual weight qualities.  The design achieves repetition by use of like sizes and variation by using sizes that differ slightly.

Help Center Layout

Many goals were in mind when designing the landscape for the Bozeman Help Center.  Most importantly, as a group, we wanted to provide an element of healing brought on by the senses of those present in the garden.  In other words, we envisioned creating a sensory garden that would become a place of healing.  The paths are curvilinear and allow for a distinct change in space depending on your position.  The idea of movement and shifting vantage points creates a visually pleasing space that provokes the idea of change.  Our color choices are meant to be pleasing to the eye as well.  The fine textures and soft colors give off a feeling of safety and tranquility.

Help Center Plan

There are two main destination points that allow space for conversation and relaxation.  One of the outdoor spaces has a viewing area near the creek which provides the listener with the calming sounds of flowing water.  Upon further exploration one will find an array of plants appealing to both the sense of taste and the sense of smell.  Both strawberries and lettuce are present to add an element of interaction between the viewer and the landscape.  This can also provide time for the user to remove themselves from their own life and attain some sort of enjoyment from their environment.  There are also a variety of plants such as mint, salvia and lilac that can induce aromatherapy and once again providing an outlet for the user. 

Linda’s Garden Rendered Plan

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate cumulative learned hand graphic skills.  Designers make copies of the landscape plan called Linda’s Garden or Casa da Juliana.  Trace over plans to produce a rendered study plan demonstrating creative and expressive colored, free-hand landscape plan symbols, a pleasing color scheme, color rendering technique, shadows, labeling and lettering.  The designers use colored pencils in the plan and the two sections.  This demonstrates learned section-elevation drafting techniques using black pens and colored pencils, representing plant texture, light and shadows, people, cars, hardscape and plant material.  The designer selects an area of interest anywhere on the plan to graphically communicate through a perspective drawing.  Producing three planes within the drawing; a foreground, midground and background.  Pen weight and texture between each plane vary and a person or car is represented in the perspective to give the sketch scale.

Linda’s Garden Black & White Plan

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate cumulative learned hand graphic skills.  Designers make copies of the landscape plan called Linda’s Garden or Casa da Juliana.  Trace over plans to produce a design demonstrating creative and expressive black and white, free-hand landscape plan symbols, line weight hiarchy, hatching, tonal variety, shadows, labeling and lettering with an emphasis on a texture and tone study.  The designers also convert tropical qualities of original plans to design more appropriate graphics for planting material for Montana.  Two sections are produced, demonstrating learned section-elevation drafting techniques representing plant texture, light and shadows, people, or cars, hardscape and plant material.  Selecting a sectional line that demonstrates at least one of the following: spatial qualities; special construction detail elements; grade change or landscape elements not readable in plan view.  Analyzing the plan and graphically communicate proposed design concepts relating to areas, circulation, vertical elements, focal points and views.  The designer also selects an area of interest anywhere on the plan to graphically communicate through a perspective drawing.  Producing three planes within the drawing; a foreground, midground and background.  Pen weight and texture between each plane vary and a person or car is represented in the perspective to give the sketch scale.

Ski and Pedestrian Trail

This construction engineering detail for the Gallatin County Regional Park on Oak Street in Bozeman, Montana displays a Class II pedestrian with an adjacent x-country ski trail.  There are three primary construction standards that all county trails must be built to; Class I, Class II and Class III.  The final detail expectations were generated for another city and used as reference.  Trail classifications and materials research was completed prior to generating the detail.  Final details were produced in AutoCAD.

Horse Trail

This construction engineering detail for the Gallatin County Regional Park on Oak Street in Bozeman, Montana displays a Class II horse trail.  There are three primary construction standards that all county trails must be built to; Class I, Class II and Class III.  The final detail expectations were generated for another city and used as reference.  Trail classifications and materials research was completed prior to generating the detail.  Final details were produced in AutoCAD.